Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 273
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 273
 
 
John Dryden. (1631–1700) (continued)
 
2977
    When beauty fires the blood, how love exalts the mind!
          Cymon and Iphigenia. Line 41.
2978
    He trudg’d along unknowing what he sought,
And whistled as he went, for want of thought.
          Cymon and Iphigenia. Line 84.
2979
    The fool of nature stood with stupid eyes
And gaping mouth, that testified surprise.
          Cymon and Iphigenia. Line 107.
2980
    Love taught him shame; and shame, with love at strife,
Soon taught the sweet civilities of life.
          Cymon and Iphigenia. Line 133.
2981
    She hugg’d the offender, and forgave the offence:
Sex to the last. 1
          Cymon and Iphigenia. Line 367.
2982
    And raw in fields the rude militia swarms,
Mouths without hands; maintain’d at vast expense,
In peace a charge, in war a weak defence;
Stout once a month they march, a blustering band,
And ever but in times of need at hand.
          Cymon and Iphigenia. Line 400.
2983
    Of seeming arms to make a short essay,
Then hasten to be drunk,—the business of the day.
          Cymon and Iphigenia. Line 407.
2984
    Happy who in his verse can gently steer
From grave to light, from pleasant to severe. 2
          The Art of Poetry. Canto i. Line 75.
2985
    Happy the man, and happy he alone,
  He who can call to-day his own;
  He who, secure within, can say,
To-morrow, do thy worst, for I have liv’d to-day. 3
          Imitation of Horace. Book iii. Ode 29, Line 65.
 
Note 1.
And love the offender, yet detest the offence.—Alexander Pope: Eloisa to Abelard, line 192. [back]
Note 2.
Heureux qui, dans ses vers, sait d’une voix légère,
Passer du grave au doux, du plaisant au sévère.
Nicholas Boileau-Despreaux: L’Art Poétique, chant 1er.

Formed by thy converse, happily to steer
From grave to gay, from lively to severe.
Alexander Pope: Essay on Man, epistle iv. line 379. [back]
Note 3.
Serenely full, the epicure would say,
Fate cannot harm me; I have dined to-day.
Sydney Smith: Recipe for Salad. [back]
 

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