Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 600
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD · AUTHOR INDEX · CONCORDANCE INDEX
John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 600
 
 
Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay. (1800–1859) (continued)
 
6127
      Free trade, one of the greatest blessings which a government can confer on a people, is in almost every country unpopular.
          On Mitford’s History of Greece. 1824.
6128
      Wherever literature consoles sorrow or assuages pain; wherever it brings gladness to eyes which fail with wakefulness and tears, and ache for the dark house and the long sleep,—there is exhibited in its noblest form the immortal influence of Athens.
          On Mitford’s History of Greece. 1824.
6129
      We hold that the most wonderful and splendid proof of genius is a great poem produced in a civilized age.
          On Milton. 1825.
6130
      Nobles by the right of an earlier creation, and priests by the imposition of a mightier hand.
          On Milton. 1825.
6131
      Our academical Pharisees.
          On Milton. 1825.
6132
      The dust and silence of the upper shelf.
          On Milton. 1825.
6133
      Perhaps no person can be a poet, or even enjoy poetry, without a certain unsoundness of mind.
          On Milton. 1825.
6134
      Out of his surname they have coined an epithet for a knave, and out of his Christian name a synonym for the Devil. 1 
          On Niccolo dei Machiavelli. 1825.
6135
      Nothing is so useless as a general maxim.
          On Niccolo dei Machiavelli. 1825.
6136
      The English Bible,—a book which if everything else in our language should perish, would alone suffice to show the whole extent of its beauty and power.
          On John Dryden. 1828.
6137
      His imagination resembled the wings of an ostrich. It enabled him to run, though not to soar.
          On John Dryden. 1828.
6138
      A man possessed of splendid talents, which he often abused, and of a sound judgment, the admonitions of which he often neglected; a man who succeeded only in an inferior department of his art, but who in that department succeeded pre-eminently.
          On John Dryden. 1828.
 
Note 1.
I wish I were as sure of anything as Macaulay is of everything. William Windham (1750–1810). [back]
 

CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD · AUTHOR INDEX · CONCORDANCE INDEX
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors