Fiction > H.G. Wells > The Time Machine
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Corbis
I seemed to see a ghostly, indistinct figure sitting in a whirling mass of black and brass for a moment—a figure so transparent that the bench behind with its sheets of drawings was absolutely distinct; but this phantasm vanished as I rubbed my eyes. The Time Machine had gone.—Chap. XII, ¶19
H.G.
Wells
The Time Machine: An Invention
 
H. G. Wells
 
A dreamer obsessed with traveling through time builds himself a time machine and, much to his surprise, travels over 800,000 years into the future. The world has been transformed with a society living in apparent harmony and bliss, but as the Traveler stays in this world of the future he discovers a hidden barbaric and depraved subterranean class. Wells’s translucent commentary on the capitalist society was an instant bestseller and launched the time-travel genre.
 
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CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record
 
1898
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2000
 
 
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
Epilogue



 
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