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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
  The Palpebral Portion (tunica conjunctiva palpebrarum) is thick, opaque, highly vascular, and covered with numerous papillæ, its deeper part presenting a considerable amount of lymphoid tissue. At the margins of the lids it becomes continuous with the lining membrane of the ducts of the tarsal glands, and, through the lacrimal ducts, with the lining membrane of the lacrimal sac and nasolacrimal duct. At the lateral angle of the upper eyelid the ducts of the lacrimal gland open on its free surface; and at the medial angle it forms a semilunar fold, the plica semilunaris. The line of reflection of the conjunctiva from the upper eyelid on to the bulb of the eye is named the superior fornix, and that from the lower lid the inferior fornix.


FIG. 894– The tarsi and their ligaments. Right eye; front view. (See enlarged image)



FIG. 895– The tarsal glands, etc., seen from the inner surface of the eyelids. (See enlarged image)

  The Bulbar Portion (tunica conjunctiva bulbi).—Upon the sclera the conjunctiva is loosely connected to the bulb of the eye; it is thin, transparent, destitute of papillæ, and only slightly vascular. Upon the cornea, the conjunctiva consists only of epithelium, constituting the epithelium of the cornea, already described (see page 1007). Lymphatics arise in the conjunctiva in a delicate zone around the cornea, and run to the ocular conjunctiva.

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