Verse > Walt Whitman > Leaves of Grass
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Walt Whitman (1819–1892).  Leaves of Grass.  1900.

NOTES  190–199



190. To a Certain Civilian

First published in “Drum-Taps,” 1865, under title of “Do You Ask Dulcet Rhymes From Me?”

  l. 2  Line 2 added in 1870.

  l. 3  Drum-Taps adds “to understand?”

  l. 7  Lines 5–6–7 added in 1870.

  l. 9  “and with piano-tunes” added in 1870.

191. Pensive on Her Dead Gazing, I Heard the Mother of All

First published in “Drum-Taps,” 1865.

  l. 3  Line 3 added in 1870.

192. When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom’d

First published in “When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom’d,” 1865–6.

  l. 71  Lilacs reads “my comrade departing.”

  l. 129  Lilacs for “carol” reads “song.”

  l. 132  Lilacs for “carol” reads “surging.”

  l. 133  Lilacs for “carol” reads “surging.”

  l. 142  Lilacs reads “But praise! O praise and praise.”

  l. 148  Lilacs reads “Approach, encompassing Death—strong Deliveress!”

  l. 172  Lilacs reads “I saw the vision of armies.”

  l. 176  Lilacs reads “shreds of the flags left,” etc.

  l. 180  “of the war” added in 1870.

  l. 194  Lilacs reads “Must I leave thee,” etc.

  l. 194  Lilacs reads “Must I leave thee,” etc.

  l. 195  Lilacs reads “Must I pass from my song for thee.”

  l. 199  “retrievements out of the night” added in 1870.

  l. 200  1870 adds “I keep.”

  l. 201  1870 adds “I keep.”

  l. 204  Line 204 in “Lilacs” is next to the last line.

193. O Captain! My Captain!

First published in “When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom’d,” 1865–6.

  l. 6  Lilacs reads “Leave you not the little spot.”

  l. 14  Lilacs reads “This arm I push beneath you.”

  l. 22  Lilacs. For “mournful” reads “silent.”

194. Hush’d be the Camps To-day

(MAY 4, 1865.) [Added in 1870. 1865 reads “A. L. Buried, April 19, 1865.”]
First published in “Drum-Taps,” 1865.

  l. 11  Drum-Taps reads “Sing, with the shovel’d clods that fill the grave—a verse.”

195. This Dust was Once the Man

First published in 1870.

196. Poem of Joys

First published in 1860.

  l. 1  1860 for “the” reads “a.”

  l. 2  Line 2 added in 1870.

  l. 7  After line 7, 1860 ’67 read

“O to be on the sea! the wind, the wide waters around;
O to sail in a ship under full sail at sea.”

  l. 16  Lines 14–16 in 1860 ’67 are placed after line 165, after which 1860 ’67 add

“O love-branches! love-root! love-apples!
O chaste and electric torrents! O mad-sweet drops.”

  l. 38  After line 38, 1860 ’67 add “O of men—of women toward me as I pass—The memory of only one look—the boy lingering and waiting.”

  l. 106  Lines 103–6 in 1860 ’67 are placed before line 138.

  l. 111  1860 ’67 read “O what is proved to me this day.”

  l. 122  “the voyage of Death!” added in 1870.

  l. 123  1860 ’67 read “O the beautiful,” etc.

  l. 124  1860 ’67 read “O that of myself,” etc.

  l. 138  Stanzas 14–15–16. Lines 138–150 added in 1870.

  l. 170  Stanza 18, lines 166–170 added in 1870.

  l. 171  “new” added in 1870.

  l. 172  After line 172, 1860 ’67 read “An athlete—full of rich words—full of joys,” which ends the poem in those editions.

197. To Think of Time

First published in 1855. In 1856 under title of “Burial.” In 1860 ’67 under title of “Burial Poem.”

  l. 1  1860 ’67 begin the Poem “To think of it! To think of time—” etc.

  1855 ’60 read “to think through the retrospection.”

  l. 20  In 1855 lines 13–20 each begin with “When.”

  l. 21  1855 reads “Then the corpse-limbs stretch on the bed and the living look upon them.”

  l. 22  1855 reads “They are palpable.”

  l. 25  Line 25 added in 1870.

  l. 26  1855 ’56 read “will come to flow.”

  l. 27  1855 for “no” reads “small.”

  l. 36  Lines 34–36 added in 1870.

  l. 38  “Broadway” added in 1856.

  l. 64  1855 reads “they also are not phantasms.”

  l. 65  1855 for “delusion” reads “apparition.”

  l. 83  1855 ’60 read “cannot be eluded.”

  l. 91  After line 91, 1855 adds “A zambo or a foreheadless Crowfoot or a Comanche is not nothing.”

  l. 95  For line 95, 1855 ’56 ’60 ’67 read “I shall go with the rest—we have satisfaction.”

  l. 99  After line 99, 1855 ’56 ’60 read:

“And I have dreamed that the satisfaction is not so much changed, and that there is no life without satisfaction;
What is the earth? what are body and Soul, without satisfaction?
I shall go with the rest,
we cannot be stopped at a given point—that is no satisfaction,
To show us a good thing, or a few good things, for a space of time—that is no satisfaction,
We must have the indestructible breed of the best, regardless of time.”

  l. 102  For lines 101–2, 1855 ’56 read “If maggots and rats ended us, then suspicion, treachery, death.”

  l. 109  1855 ’56 ’60 ’67 add “How perfect is my soul!”

  l. 111  1855 for “bad” reads “sin.”

  l. 113  1855 ’56 ’60 ’67 after line 113 read

“O my soul! if I realize you I have satisfaction,
Animals and vegetables! if I realize you I have satisfaction,
Laws of the earth and air! if I realize you I have satisfaction.

I cannot define my satisfaction—yet it is so.
I cannot define my life—yet it is so.”

  l. 114  1860 ’67 begin stanza 11 “O it comes to me now.”

  “without exception” added in 1860.

  l. 118  1855 ’56 read “and life and death are for it.” 1860 ’67 read “and life and death are altogether for it.”

198. Chanting the Square Deific

First published in “When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom’d,” 1865–6.

  l. 5  “old” added in 1870.

199. Whispers of Heavenly Death

First published in 1870.

CONTENTS      BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD


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