Nonfiction > Harvard Classics > Edmund Burke > Reflections on the French Revolution
Learning will be cast into the mire and trodden down under the hoofs of a swinish multitude.
Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. iii. p. 335.
Edmund
Burke
Harvard Classics, Vol. 24, Part 3
 
Reflections on the Revolution in France
And on the Proceeding in Certain Societies in London Relative to That Event in a Letter Intended to Have Been Sent to a Gentleman in Paris. 1790
 
Edmund Burke
 
Written immediately after the French Revolution, Burke’s primary antirevolutionary work questions the motives of the actors and warns against the pulling down of all that is good in society with the bad, which would prove amazingly prophetic.
 
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CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record
NEW YORK: P.F. COLLIER & SON COMPANY, 1909–14
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2001
 
 
Introductory Note
 
Paras. 1–24
Paras. 25–49
Paras. 50–74
Paras. 75–99
Paras. 100–124
Paras. 125–149
Paras. 150–174
Paras. 175–199
Paras. 200–224
Paras. 225–249
Paras. 250–274
Paras. 275–299
Paras. 300–324
Paras. 325–349
Paras. 350–374
Paras. 375–407


 
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