Verse > Sir Walter Raleigh > Poems
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Sir Walter Raleigh (1554?–1618).  Poems.  1892.
 
XXIII.
Fragments and Epigrams
 
I.
THIS made him write in a glass window, obvious to the Queen’s eye—
  “‘Fain would I climb, yet fear I to fall.’
 
Her Majesty, either espying or being shown it, did under-write—
  “‘If thy heart fails thee, climb not at all.’”
 
II.
  “SIR WA. RAWLEY made this rhyme upon the name of a gallant, one Mr. Noel:—
        5
“Noe. L.
“‘The word of denial and the letter of fifty
Makes the gentleman’s name that will never be thrifty.’
 
“And Noel’s answer:—
“‘Raw. Ly.
        10
“The foe to the stomach and the word of disgrace
Shews the gentleman’s name with the bold face.’”
 
III.
IN vain mine eyes, in vain you waste your tears;
In vain my sighs, the smokes of my despairs;
In vain you search the earth and heavens above;        15
In vain ye seek; for Fortune keeps my love.
 
IV.
WITH wisdom’s eyes had but blind fortune seen,
Then had my love, my love for ever been.
 
V.
EPITAPH ON THE EARL OF LEICESTER.
(Died Sept. 4, 1588.)
HERE lies the noble warrior that never blunted sword;
Here lies the noble courtier that never kept his word;        20
Here lies his excellency that governed all the state;
Here lies the L. of Leicester that all the world did hate.
WA. RA.
 
VI.
EPITAPH ON THE EARL OF SALISBURY.
(Died May 24, 1612.)
HERE lies Hobbinol, our pastor whilere,
That once in a quarter our fleeces did sheer.
To please us his cur he kept under clog,        25
And was ever after both shepherd and dog.
For oblation to Pan his custom was thus:—
He first gave a trifle, then offered up us.
And through his false worship such power he did gain,
As kept him o’th’ mountain and us on the plain:        30
Where many a hornpipe he tuned to his Phyllis,
And sweetly sung Walsingham to ’s Amaryllis.
(Two lines omitted.)
 
VII.
A POEM PUT INTO MY LADY LAITON’S POCKET BY SIR WALTER RALEIGH.
LADY, farewell, whom I in silence serve!
  Would God thou knewest the depth of my desire!
Then mought I wish, though nought I can deserve,        35
  Some drops of grace to slake my scalding fire;
But sith to live alone I have decreed,
I’ll spare to speak, that I may spare to speed!
 
VIII.
SIR W. RALEIGH ON THE SNUFF OF A CANDLE THE NIGHT BEFORE HE DIED.
COWARDS [may] fear to die; but courage stout,
Rather than live in snuff, will be put out.        40
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors