Nonfiction > Sigmund Freud > Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego
Freud
The impulses which a group obeys may according to circumstances be generous or cruel, heroic or cowardly, but they are always so imperious that no personal interest, not even that of self-preservation, can make itself felt.
Chapter II.
Sigmund
Freud
Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego
 
Sigmund Freud
 
 
CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record    Translator’s Note
 
TRANSLATED BY JAMES STRACHEY
 
NEW YORK: BONI AND LIVERIGHT, [1922]
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2010
 
I. Introduction
II. Le Bon’s Description of the Group Mind
III. Other Accounts of Collective Mental Life
IV. Suggestion and Libido
V. Two Artificial Groups: The Church and the Army
VI. Further Problems and Lines of Work
VII. Identification
VIII. Being in Love and Hypnosis
IX. The Herd Instinct
X. The Group and the Primal Horde
XI. A Differentiating Grade in the Ego
XII. Postscript


 
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