Verse > Anthologies > J. C. Squire, ed. > A Book of Women’s Verse
verse
From an untroubled mind should verses flow; / My discontents make mine too muddy show; / And hoarse encumbrances of houshold care; / Where these remaine, the Muses ne’er repaire.
To William Drummond of Hawthornden, ll. 7–10.
Mary Oxlie
of Morpet
A Book of Women’s Verse
 
Edited with a Prefatory Essay by J. C. Squire
 
179 expertly selected poems by the best women poets in English.
 
 
CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record    Preface
 
OXFORD: CLARENDON PRESS, 1921
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2011
 

Anne Askewe.  
 c. 1520–1546.  
The Balade whych Anne Askewe made and sange when she was in Newgate
Queen Elizabeth.  
 1533–1603.  
On Her Enemies
Answer to a Popish Priest, Giving Her Opinion on the Corporeal Presence
Lady Elizabeth Carew.  
 fl. 1613.  
Chorus from ‘Mariam
Mary Oxlie of Morpet.  
 Early 17th cent.  
To William Drummond of Hawthornden
Lady Mary Wroth.  
 c. 1620.  
Song: “Love, a child, is ever crying
Anne Bradstreet.  
 1612–1672.  
Dedication: ‘To My Dear Children
Epitaph for Queen Elizabeth
Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle.  
 1624–1674.  
Love and Poetry
Anonymous.  
 1652.  
To My Husband
Ann Collins.  
 c. 1650.  
Song: “The Winter being over
The Soul’s Home
Katherine Philips (‘Orinda’).  
 c. 1650.  
To my Excellent Lucasia, on our Friendship
A Revery
Orinda to Lucasia
An Answer to another persuading a Lady to Marriage
Orinda upon Little Hector Philips
Anne, Marchioness of Wharton.  
 1632–1685.  
On the Storm between Gravesend and Dieppe
A Song: “How hardly I conceal’d my tears
Aphra Behn.  
 1640–1689.  
Song: “Love in fantastic triumph sat
Song from ‘Lycidus
Song: “Cease, cease, Aminta, to complain
Song: “How strongly does my passion flow
Song: “A thousand martyrs I have made
‘Ephelia’.  
 17th Cent.?  
Love’s First Approach
Song: “You wrong me, Strephon, when you say
To one that asked me why I loved J. G.
Mocked in Anger
Fortune Mistaken
To Phylocles, inviting him to Friendship
My Fate
Mary Mollineux.  
 c. 1648–1695.  
On the Sight of a Skull
To Her Lord
Anne Killigrew.  
 1661?–1685.  
On a Picture painted by Herself, representing Two Nymphs of Diana
Upon the Saying that My Verses were made by Another
Epitaph on Herself
Mrs. Taylor.  
 c. 1685.  
Song: “Strephon hath fashion, wit, and youth
Mary, Lady Chudleigh.  
 1656–1710.  
Solitude
Song: “Why, Damon, why, why, why so pressing?”
Anne, Countess of Winchilsea.  
 1660–1720.  
The Soldier’s Death
The Sensual Man
A Nocturnal Reverie
A Wish for Her Retreat
Adam Pos’d
The Wit and the Beau
The Critick and the Writer of Fables
To Death
Lady Grisel Baillie.  
 1665–1746.  
Werena my Heart’s licht
The Ewe-Buchtin’s Bonnie
Hon. Mary Monk.  
 ?–1715.  
On a Favourite Dog
Epitaph on a Gallant Lady
Verses, written on her Death-bed at Bath to her Husband in London
Elizabeth (Singer) Rowe.  
 1674–1737.  
From Her Elegy on Her Husband, who died Young
To a Friend who Persuades me to Leave the Muse
Catharine Cockburn.  
 1679–1749.  
Song—The Vain Advice
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.  
 1689–1762.  
Verses addressed to the Imitator of the First Satire of the Second Book of Horace
An Answer to a Love-Letter
In Answer to a Lady Who Advised Retirement
Fanny Greville.  
 18th cent.  
Prayer for Indifference
Laetitia Pilkington.  
 1712–1750.  
Written on her Death-Bed
Alison Cockburn.  
 1712–1794.  
The Flowers of the Forest
Mary Masters.  
 c. 1733.  
To One who Questioned her being the Author of some Verses
Answer to a Panegyrick by one who supposed her handsome
Judith Madan.  
 c. 1750.  
Written in her brother’s Coke upon Littleton
Elizabeth Carter.  
 1717–1806.  
Epitaph on an Infant
Mary Leapor.  
 1722–1746.  
Upon her Play being returned to Her Stained with Claret
Hope
Of Friendship
Mary Jones.  
 ?–1778.  
An Epistle to Lady Bowyer
Jane Elliot.  
 1727–1805.  
A Lament for Flodden
Jenny Grahame.  
 18th cent.  
Wedlock
Isobel Pagan.  
 1741–1821.  
Ca’ the Yowes
Anne Hunter.  
 1742–1821.  
My Mother Bids me Bind my Hair
Anna Laetitia Barbauld.  
 1743–1825.  
To a Lady with Some Flowers
Life
Frances Brooke.  
 1724–1789.  
Song: “Her mouth, which a smile
Susanna Blamire.  
 1747–1794.  
Song: “And ye shall walk in silk attire
Charlotte Smith.  
 1749–1806.  
Sonnet Written at the Close of Spring
Lady Anne (Lindsay) Barnard.  
 1750–1825.  
Auld Robin Gray
Henrietta, Lady O’Neill.  
 1758–1793.  
On Seeing Her Two Sons at Play
Joanna Baillie.  
 1762–1851.  
A Mother to Her Waking Infant
The Kitten
Song: “The gowan glitters on the sward
The Outlaw
Catherine M. Fanshawe.  
 1765–1834.  
A Riddle on the Letter H
Mary Lamb.  
 1764–1847.  
A Child
Caroline, Lady Nairne.  
 1766–1845.  
The Land o’ the Leal
The Auld House
Caller Herrin
Heavenward
Helen Maria Williams.  
 1762–1827.  
Sonnet to Twilight
Sonnet to Hope
Anne M’Vicar Grant of Laggan.  
 1755–1838.  
Postscript
Amelia Opie.  
 1769–1853.  
A Lament
Caroline Southey.  
 1786–1854.  
To Death
Emma (Hart) Willard.  
 1787–1870.  
Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep
Felicia Dorothea Hemans.  
 1793–1835.  
Night-Blowing Flowers
Casabianca
A Dirge
Sara Coleridge.  
 1802–1852.  
O Sleep, my Babe
Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  
 1806–1861.  
To George Sand. I. A Desire
To George Sand. II. A Recognition
Sonnets from the Portuguese. i
Sonnets from the Portuguese. iii
Sonnets from the Portuguese. vi
Sonnets from the Portuguese. xxii
Sonnets from the Portuguese. xxviii
Sonnets from the Portuguese. xliii
A Musical Instrument
The Cry of the Children
To Flush, My Dog
The Deserted Garden
Grief
Helen Selina, Lady Dufferin.  
 1807–1867.  
Lament of the Irish Emigrant
The Hon. Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton.  
 1808–1877.  
I Do Not Love Thee
Charlotte Brontë.  
 1816–1855.  
He Saw My Heart’s Woe
Evening Solace
Speak of the North!
Emily Brontë.  
 1818–1848.  
Remembrance
The Visionary
Fall, Leaves, Fall
The Prisoner
Stanzas to [Branwell Brontë?]
Often Rebuked
Last Lines
Julia Ward Howe.  
 1819–1911.  
Battle-Hymn of the Republic
Our Orders
Anne Brontë.  
 1820–1849.  
If This Be All
In Memory of a Happy Day in February
Phoebe Cary.  
 1824–1871.  
One Sweetly Solemn Thought
Christina Rossetti.  
 1830–1894.  
Song: “When I am dead, my dearest
Sonnet: “The irresponsive silence of the land
Echo
A Soul
Good Friday
Twice
Rest
Up-hill
Remember
Bride-Song
A Birthday
Amor Mundi
In Progress
What would I give!
Jean Ingelow.  
 1820–1897.  
The High Tide on the Coast of Lincolnshire (1571)
Lady Currie (Violet Fane).  
 1843–1905.  
Forbidden Lave
The Hon. Emily Lawless.  
 1845–1913.  
Fontenoy (1745)
Fanny Parnell.  
 1854–1882.  
After Death
Mary Elizabeth Coleridge.  
 1861–1907.  
A Moment
Gone
Unwelcome
Amy Levy.  
 1861–1889.  
A London Plane-Tree
In September
In the Nower
Cambridge in the Long
New Love, New Life
London Poets
Dora Sigerson Shorter.  
 1866–1918.  
Sixteen Dead Men
Ireland
Alice Meynell.  
 1847–1922.  
In Manchester Square
Christ in the Universe
Renouncement
A Letter from a Girl to Her own Old Age
Chimes
Margaret L. Woods.  
 1856–1945.  
To the Forgotten Dead
Genius Loci
A Ballade of the Night
Rose Terry Cooke.  
 1827–1892.  
Arachne
Violet Jacob.  
 1863–1946.  
Tam i’ the Kirk
Anna Bunston De Bary  The Snowdrop
Moira O’Neill.  
 1864–1955.  
The Rachray Man
The Grand Match
Frances Cornford.  
 1886–1960.  
Autumn Evening
Autumn Morning at Cambridge
The Watch
Eva Gore-Booth.  
 1870–1926.  
The Little Waves of Breffny
Katharine Tynan Hinkson.  
 1861–1931.  
Sheep and Lambs
Rose Macaulay  The Devourers
Sylvia Lynd.  
 1888–1952.  
Hunting Song


 
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