Verse > Anthologies > Harriet Monroe, ed. > Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, 1912–22
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Harriet Monroe, ed. (1860–1936).  Poetry: A Magazine of Verse.  1912–22.
 
Upstairs Downstairs
By Hervey Allen
 
From “The Sea-islands”

THE JUDGE, who lives impeccably upstairs
With dull decorum and its implication,
Has all his servants in to family prayers
And edifies his soul with exhortation.
Meanwhile, his blacks live wastefully downstairs;        5
Not always chaste, they manage to exist
With less decorum than the judge upstairs,
And find withal a something that he missed.
 
This painful fact a Swede philosopher,
Who tarried for a fortnight in our city,        10
Remarked one evening at the meal, before
We paralyzed him silent with our pity;
Saying the black man, living with the white,
Had given more than white men could requite.
 
 
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