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CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Contention
 
  In excessive altercation, truth is lost.
Syrus.    
  1
  Religious contention is the devil’s harvest.
La Fontaine.    
  2
  Great contests generally excite great animosities.
Livy.    
  3
  He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper.
Burke.    
  4
  Contention is a hydra’s head; the more they strive the more they may: and as Praxiteles did by his glass, when he saw a scurvy face in it, brake it in pieces: but for that one he saw many more as bad in a moment.
Burton.    
  5
        When two discourse, if the one’s anger rise,
The man who lets the contest fall is wise.
Plutarch.    
  6
                        Contentions fierce,
Ardent, and dire, spring from no petty cause.
Scott.    
  7
        Great contest follows, and much learned dust
Involves the combatants; each claiming truth,
And truth disclaiming both.
Cowper.    
  8
  A quarrel is quickly settled when deserted by one party; there is no battle unless there be two.
Seneca.    
  9
        Birds in their little nests agree:
And ’tis a shameful sight,
When children of one family
Fall out, and chide, and fight.
Isaac Watts.    
  10
                    Contention, like a horse
Full of high feeding, madly hath broke loose,
And bears down all before him.
Shakespeare.    
  11
        Even as a broken mirror, which the glass
In every fragment multiplies, and makes
A thousand images of one that was
The same, and still the more, the more it breaks.
Byron.    
  12
        Some say, compared to Bononcini,
That Mynheer Handel’s but a ninny;
Others aver,—that he to Handel
Is scarcely fit to hold a candle:
Strange all this difference should be,
’Twixt tweedle-dum and tweedle-dee?
John Byrom.    
  13
        Thus when a barber and collier fight,
The barber beats the luckless collier—white;
The dusty collier heaves his ponderous sack,
And, big with vengeance, beats the barber—black.
In comes the brick-dust man, with grime o’erspread,
And beats the collier and the barber—red;
Black, red, and white, in various clouds are toss’d,
And in the dust they raise the combatants are lost.
Christopher Smart.    
  14
 
 
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