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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Fredrika Bremer
 
  A fly is a very light burden; but if it were perpetually to return and settle on one’s nose, it might weary us of our very lives.  1
  At a certain depth all bosoms communicate, all hearts are one.  2
  Gentle feelings produce profoundly beneficial effects upon stern natures. It is the spring rain which melts the ice-covering of the earth, and causes it to open to the beams of heaven.  3
  If you will learn the seriousness of life, and its beauty also, live for your husband; make him happy.  4
  People have generally three epochs in their confidence in man. In the first they believe him to be everything that is good, and they are lavish with their friendship and confidence. In the next, they have had experience, has smitten down their confidence, and they then have to be careful not to mistrust every one, and to put the worst construction upon everything. Later in life, they learn that the greater number of men have much more good in them than bad, and that even when there is cause to blame, there is more reason to pity than condemn; and then a spirit of confidence again awakens within them.  5
  People who are arrogant on account of their wealth are about equal to our Laplanders, who measure a man’s worth by the number of his reindeer.  6
  Serenity of manners is the zenith of beauty.  7
  The human heart is like heaven; the more angels the more room.  8
  The humble soul is like the violet, which grows low, hangs the head downward, and hides itself with its own leaves.  9
  When the first time of love is over, there comes a something better still. Then comes that other love; that faithful friendship which never changes, and which will accompany you with its calm light through the whole of life. It is only needful to place yourself so that it may come, and then it comes of itself. And then everything turns and changes itself to the best.  10
  Who has not experienced how, on near acquaintance, plainness becomes beautified, and beauty loses its charm, exactly according to the quality of the heart and mind? And from this cause am I of opinion that the want of outward beauty never disquiets a noble nature or will be regarded as a misfortune. It never can prevent people from being amiable and beloved in the highest degree.  11
 
 
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