Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Henry Felton
 
  Raw and injudicious writers propose one thing for their subject, and run off to another.
Henry Felton.    
  1
 
  In comparison of these divine writers the noblest wits of the heathen world are low and dull.
Henry Felton.    
  2
 
  Enlarging an author’s sense, and building fancies of our own upon his foundation, we may call paraphrasing: but more properly, changing, adding, patching, piecing.
Henry Felton.    
  3
 
  All these together are the foundation of all those heaps of comments, which are piled so high upon authors that it is difficult sometimes to clear the text from the rubbish.
Henry Felton.    
  4
 
  The obscurity is brought over them by ignorance and age, made yet more obscure by their pedantical elucidators.
Henry Felton.    
  5
 
  The best writers have been perplexed with notes and obscured with illustrations.
Henry Felton.    
  6
 
  Mr. Dryden wrote more like a scholar; and, though the greatest master of poetry, he wanted that easiness, that air of freedom and unconstraint which is more sensibly to be perceived than described.
Henry Felton.    
  7
 
  In some who have run up to men without education we may observe many great qualities darkened and eclipsed: their minds are crusted over, like diamonds in the rock.
Henry Felton.    
  8
 
  False eloquence passeth only where true is not understood.
Henry Felton.    
  9
 
  In English I would have all Gallicisms avoided, that our tongue may be sincere, and that we may keep to our own language.
Henry Felton.    
  10
 
  There is a vast treasure in the old English, from whence authors may draw constant supplies; as our officers make their surest remits from the coal-works and the mines.
Henry Felton.    
  11
 
  The great disadvantage our historians labour under is too tedious an interruption by the insertion of records in their narration.
Henry Felton.    
  12
 
  I do not apprehend any difficulty in collecting and commonplacing a universal history from the historians.
Henry Felton.    
  13
 
  Languages, like our bodies, are in a perpetual flux, and stand in need of recruits to supply those words that are continually falling through disuse.
Henry Felton.    
  14
 
  The French have indeed taken worthy pains to make classic learning speak their language: if they have not succeeded, it must be imputed to a certain talkativeness and airiness represented in their tongue; which will never agree with the sedateness of the Romans or the solemnity of the Greeks.
Henry Felton.    
  15
 
 
 
  Rules and critical observations improve a good genius, where nature leadeth the way, provided he is not too scrupulous: for that will introduce a stiffness and affectation which are utterly abhorrent from all good writing.
Henry Felton.    
  16
 
  Catullus, though his lines be rough and his numbers inharmonious, I could recommend for the softness and delicacy, but must decline for the looseness of his thoughts.
Henry Felton.    
  17
 
  Horace hath exposed those trifling poetasters that spend themselves in glaring descriptions and sewing here and there some cloth of gold on their sackcloth.
Henry Felton.    
  18
 
  The first qualification of a good translator is an exact understanding, an absolute mastery, of the language he translateth from and the language he translateth to.
Henry Felton.    
  19
 
  The most literal translation of the Scriptures, in the most natural signification of the word, is generally the best, and the same punctualness which debaseth other writings preserveth the spirit and majesty of the sacred text.
Henry Felton.    
  20
 
  Truth, of all things the plainest and sincerest, is forced to gain admittance in disguise and court us in masquerade.
Henry Felton.    
  21
 
  Scholars are close and frugal of their words, and not willing to let any go for ornament, if they will not serve for use.
Henry Felton.    
  22
 
  There is another extreme in obscure writers which some empty conceited heads are apt to run into, out of a prodigality of words and a want of sense.
Henry Felton: On the Classics.    
  23
 
  Images are very sparingly to be introduced: their proper place is in poems and orations, and their use is to move pity or terror, compassion, and resentment.
Henry Felton: On the Classics.    
  24
 
 
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