Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
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Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
 
Tea
 
Tea! thou soft, thou sober, sage, and venerable liquid;—thou female tongue—running, smile-smoothing, heart-opening, wink-tippling cordial, to whose glorious insipidity I owe the happiest moment of my life, let me fall prostrate.
        Colley Cibber.—The Lady’s Last Stake, Act I. Scene 1.
  1
The Muse’s friend, tea does our fancy aid,
  Repress those vapours which the head invade,
And keeps that palace of the soul serene,
  Fit on her birth-day to salute the Queen.
        Waller.—Of Tea, from last lines.
  2
The ship from Ceylon, Inde, or far Cathay, unloads for him the fragrant produce of each trip.
        Byron.—Don Juan, Canto XII. St. 9.
  3
And sip with nymphs their elemental tea.
        Pope.—Rape of the Lock, Canto I. Line 62.
  4
Te veniente die, te decedente canebat.
        Virgil.—Georgics, Book IV. Line 466.
  5
  [Translated.—“Thee did he sing as day approached, thee as it departed.” A punster has thus rendered it:—
        “At morning he sang the praises of tea,
        The praises of tea too at ev’ning sang he.”
A facetious Cantab is said to have placed upon his tea-caddy the Latin words, Tu Doces, (i.e., Thou teachest,) rendering the phrase into a punning motto, Thou tea-chest.—Riley’s Dict. Class. Quot. 456.]
  6
 
 
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